CollectionDX Network

Big Fau

Comments

17 comments posted
These pictures really make

These pictures really make this toy look fantastic; I wish I could justify the purchase right now because I know the aftermarket is going to be crazy but seeing this thing released is like a dream come true. Maybe some day we'll get Dorothy 2 or Beck the Great RX-3.

I'm actually surprised by the poseability in the upper body you mention it has some in the legs but do they bend at all or is it all swivel?

On another note, does anyone know why this Megadeus wasn't called "Big Trio?"

The Galaxy Ranger's picture
Posted by The Galaxy Ranger on 26 January, 2012 - 11:28
Wait... we already have a

Wait... we already have a Dorothy 2; Dororthy 1 is the megadeus.
But, man! I would love to have that in a soft vinyl. Osrail, too, especially since we never got to see him un-destroyed.

And the legs are all swivels. No high-class joints here, my friend!

As for the reason why Big Fau is not Big Trio? Uh... 'cuz that sounds lame? Ha! But seriously, I have no idea why it's not Big Trio. However, in kanji for Big Fau -- ビッグファウ -- translates to Big Fouling. A fouling is "an encrusted deposit, especially on a submerged object, as the hull of a ship." It may have something to do with the nautical aspect of Fau and that "Fau" sounds like the first syllable of fouling.

Who knows.

VIR's picture
Posted by VIR on 26 January, 2012 - 12:05
Can you paste or link to the

Can you paste or link to the kanji spelling? I didn't realize that the Megadeus names were also spelled in kanji.

SpaceRunaway's picture
Posted by SpaceRunaway on 26 January, 2012 - 13:52
Well, Goodsmile has the Kanji

Well, Goodsmile has the Kanji as びっぐふぁう, which translates as Biggu Fau.
Wikipedia -- don't spear me -- has it as ビッグファウ, which Google Translate also suggests instead of びっぐふぁう.

VIR's picture
Posted by VIR on 26 January, 2012 - 14:29
Kanji is generally refereed

Kanji is generally refereed to Japanese characters with a Chinese origin.

Kana is the overall word for Kanji, Hiragana and Katakana.

Cheers!
Leonardo

Showapop's picture
Posted by Showapop on 26 January, 2012 - 14:42
To clarify on Leo's point,

To clarify on Leo's point, Kana is broken into three different types.

Hirangana is phonetic, and is usually used for Japanese words. びっぐふぁう is Hirangana.

Katakana is used for foreign words, so BIG and FAU, not being Japanese words, would be ビッグファウ.

I don't know enough about Japanese to know why they spelled it using Hirangana, but they must be interchangeable in some circumstances.

JoshB's picture
Posted by JoshB on 26 January, 2012 - 14:48
Ah! I see. There's still so

Ah! I see.
There's still so much for me to learn in this world...

Thanks for pointing that out!

VIR's picture
Posted by VIR on 26 January, 2012 - 14:52
I've seen it go both ways

I've seen it go both ways concerning Hiragana and Katakana, in fact certain Japanese words are sometimes only spelled as Katakana but generally speaking the statement that Josh said is correct.

Excellent review btw~!

Cheers!
LF

Showapop's picture
Posted by Showapop on 26 January, 2012 - 16:24
I was in class most of today,

I was in class most of today, so I couldn't follow the thread until now. I was thinking that perhaps you meant that Sunrise had used kanji characters to represent the phonetic spelling, i.e., what Konami does with Contra and Salamander (not that there's been any recent Salamander games). Sometimes, you'll see kanji used to simply represent a concept, while an invented, "correct" reading of it is included above or alongside it.
But yeah, the fouling idea is a nifty one, but it doesn't look like there's anything to it, as "fau-" in Japanese doesn't mean anything.

SpaceRunaway's picture
Posted by SpaceRunaway on 26 January, 2012 - 18:11
Yes, I've seen people use

Yes, I've seen people use Kanji as phonetic representations as well, but it's odd to even for the Japanese and rarely used.

Recently on my Japanese Group Sounds thread on FB, somebody posted a video with Ed Sullivan's name spelled with Kanji used phonetically. My Japanese friends all got a laugh out of it as normally is would have been spelled with Katakana. Yes it happens but not regularly.

Generally those smaller Kana on top of or besides the Kanji is for young people who haven't learned all their Kanji yet and need reminders so they know how to pronounce the word in case they don't know the specific Kanji/Chinese Character.

I have a feeling I will be podcasting on "Japanese Language" soon!

Leonardo

Showapop's picture
Posted by Showapop on 26 January, 2012 - 18:43
It's probably a little more

It's probably a little more common than you might have experienced. It happens quite a bit in video games, anime and manga, especially when dealing with SF or fantasy settings.

Edit: Specifically the use of furigana to provide unique readings of kanji, that literally happens all the time in manga.

Edit+1: This stuff only really applies to creative writing. If anyone out there is trying to learn Japanese, don't do this.

SpaceRunaway's picture
Posted by SpaceRunaway on 26 January, 2012 - 21:21
Typing in Japanese

I made a ShowaPop! Blog last night on how to convert your computer to type Japanese, it has some useful info.

http://otaku.collectiondx.com/blog/showapop-episode-3-easily-convert-your-computer-type-japanese-here-part-1

Cheers
Leonardo

Showapop's picture
Posted by Showapop on 27 January, 2012 - 11:40
ENEMY HAS ANOTHER BIG!?

ENEMY HAS ANOTHER BIG!?

VF5SS's picture
Posted by VF5SS on 26 January, 2012 - 13:56
Seebach. No! Schwarzwald!

Seebach.
No! Schwarzwald!

VIR's picture
Posted by VIR on 26 January, 2012 - 14:32
i honestly never realized

i honestly never realized that the Bigs each represented air land and sea until you pointed out the submarine tower on Faus back!

relating back to the language discussion, does the O in Big O mean King in a Hiragana Katakana switch-up wordplay thing?

Astronopolis's picture
Posted by Astronopolis on 27 January, 2012 - 13:26
Yes, each Big is land, air,

Yes, each Big is land, air, and sea. They are also representative of the three legendary beasts: Behemoth, Ziz, and Leviathan.

And as for the Hiragana/Katakana thing, I can't say. I always thought, however, that The Big O stood for the big O from Big O notation. I think this because the letter "O" is the solving factor of a "paradigm" equation.

See any similarities? :3

VIR's picture
Posted by VIR on 27 January, 2012 - 16:12
everyone knows about

everyone knows about leviathan and behemoth, but i had to look up Ziz.

I had no idea what the name for the robot came from, i thought it was just some japanese gibberish. its probably common info for math types (i went the artist route), but for a show so focused on big dumb action i never expected I'd be surfing Wikipedias math articles regarding mathematical notations!

now that i stop and think about it, Japan is kind of just like that though lol

Astronopolis's picture
Posted by Astronopolis on 29 January, 2012 - 14:54
 
CollectionDX OtakuDX Love is Pop WTF Toy Chogokin.net